Remembering 9/11: How one Princeton, WV veteran honored the fallen through art

Hash says he would love to know which museum has his piece. If you have seen Hash’s piece in a museum gallery let us know by emailing news@wvva.com or jbolden@wvva.com
Published: Sep. 11, 2022 at 3:48 PM EDT
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PRINCETON, W.Va. (WVVA) - Life is filled with acts and sometimes the next act is just fulfilling if not more than the last--such as the case for U.S. Vietnam War veteran and Princeton, WV resident Cecil Hash.

In 2000, Hash retired from a machinery shop which sharped the tools used in oil fields.

He quickly gravitated to another craft that would required his handiwork--cutting and fusing stained glass.

“I liked the idea when I got retired I’d have something to do,” said Hash.

He recalls that a bird and palm tree were among his first pieces, which were small compared to what he would go on to create as the years passed on.

“They start you out simple.”

The artist is an avid hunter and is quick to point to the bear and dear stained glass art that adorns his home.

“These is probably my favorite. I’m into hunting,” said Hash.

While spending a hours upon hours creating these stained glass works of art, Hash said that he has never charged a dime to anyone who owns one of his pieces.

A year into the craft his newfound trade and skill would help him and others process the emotions of September 11, 2001.

“It took me 50 hours to do it,” said Hash. “It bothers me to talk about it. Thousands of people died.”

Hash said his faith helped him create the piece of the Twin Towers with prayer hands above.

“I thought, ‘there should be something good in this’ and said, ‘Lord help me and we’ll make it.’”

The brother of Hash’s art teacher, who happens to be a police officer, saw the completed piece and upon discussion they agreed that the officer would take it to NYC and gift it to the NYPD.

Hash was told eventually the stained glass artwork made its way from NYC to a museum in Washington, D.C.

Hash hasn’t seen the piece since he gifted it those who protect and serve our country but said he knows it was the right thing to do.

“I figured I did one of the things in life that I was supposed to. You do very few things in life and that was one of them.”

Hash says he would love to know which museum has his piece. If you have seen Hash’s piece in a museum gallery let us know by emailing news@wvva.com or jbolden@wvva.com

See the full report this Sunday, September 11th at 6 PM & 11 PM and Monday, September 12th from 5-7 AM & Noon.