Random drawing set to end Virginia election tie - WVVA TV Bluefield Beckley WV News, Weather and Sports

Random drawing set to end Virginia election tie

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RICHMOND, VA (AP) -

The Virginia elections board plans to hold a random drawing next week to break a tie in a state House race that could swing partisan control of the chamber.

Virginia Board of Elections Chairman James Alcorn said on Twitter Thursday that the board will met Dec. 27 to break the tie.

A three-judge panel certified the 94th District as tied at 11,608 to 11,608 on Wednesday, a day after a recount appeared to give Democrat Shelly Simonds the victory over Republican Del. David Yancey.

By law, the winner's name will be drawn at random by an elections' official.

If Yancey wins, Republicans will hold on to power in the House by one seat, 51-49.

If Simonds wins, a rare bipartisan power-sharing agreement would have to be brokered.


Control of the Virginia House could depend on which old film canister an election official pulls out of a glass bowl.

A three-judge panel certified the 94th District in Newport News as tied on Wednesday, a day after a dramatic recount appeared to give Democrat Shelly Simonds a victory over Del. David Yancey by a single vote.

By state law, the winner of the tie will be determined "by lot."

A win by the Democrat would make the house evenly split between parties.

Virginia Board of Elections Chairman James Alcorn said the board will likely pick the winner the same way it picks ballot order. He said each candidate's name is placed into a separate film canister. The canisters are placed into a glass bowl and shaken up. The canister containing the winner's name is pulled out at random by a board member


A court has now declared a tie in a Virginia House election that one day earlier appeared to have gone to a Democrat by a single vote.

A three-judge panel certified the 94th District in Newport News as tied at 11,608 to 11,608 on Wednesday, a day after a dramatic recount appeared to give Democrat Shelly Simonds the victory over Del. David Yancey.

Yancey successfully challenged an uncounted ballot he said should have been included in his total.

By state law, the winner of the tie will be determined "by lot." It was not immediately clear how or when that will take place.

The outcome likely deciding partisan control of the House of Delegates. If Yancey wins, Republicans will hold on to power by one seat, 51-49. If Simonds wins, a rare power-sharing agreement would have to be brokered between Democrats and Republicans.

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