The Compact Disc Turns 30 - WVVA TV Bluefield Beckley WV News, Weather and Sports

The Compact Disc Turns 30

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NBC News - It's all about the music at Lou's Records, where you can still find vinyl albums in the bins. But the old fashion record nearly disappeared 30 years ago when the first compact discs hit the market.

"Kind of cool because it was a small package and it was convenient and it sounded pretty good but it sounded different."

A different sound, a different experience for music lovers.

DJ and Program Director Dave Mason says the difference with the CD was clarity, and the silence.

"And we were so used to hearing the hiss and the crackle and the scratches in vinyl, that when the CD came out we thought, this is just so unusual."

And people jumped on the change, eventually flocking to the new format.

"I mean you had to get everything that came out on vinyl originally that you had sitting in a closet somewhere, you had to get the compact disc because it sounded so much better."

"It could be in your car, it could be in your home, it could be in the little portable walkman, it could be everywhere."

But that portability is now killing the disc. The music fan today doesn't need a CD in their hand, they have it on their computer, their phone and their iPod.

"I have bins full of CDs that I never look at, they're all collecting dust."

"Of course the more things change the more they stay the same. Here at Lou Records, nearly half of the music they sell is still on vinyl."

"The physical goods are fading away but I don't believe they are going to go away."

In fact, Lou says it's more the younger customers who are buying the vinyl albums; customers who weren't even born when the first CDs hit the market 30 years ago.

 

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